Education / Home Systems

October Open House

Bell Siphon

Please come to our open house on Saturday, October 24th from 2-4 PM at our south side facility in the basement of 401 Bingham St., Pittsburgh PA. There is plenty of free street parking available. Learn about Bell Siphons and how to build your own. Or buy one of ours to start your own Aquaponics system. Come see our indoor Aquaponic system that has been running virtually maintenance-free for nearly 2 years now! Please come with your questions and curiosity. We’re eager to show you and teach you about Aquaponics so that you can begin growing this way 365 days a year in your home,

Share Button
Home Systems

New 20-gallon Home Aquaponic System

Before we built our 20-gallon demonstration Aquaponic system for the Farm to Table conference in March, we suspected that people wanted something like this for their homes, schools and offices. After the feedback at the conference, we definitely know that people want this. While the demonstration system was meant to be only that, many asked if they could buy it and take it home! So, we started looking for a system to bring to Pittsburgh. After much research and testing, we assembled a fantastic, cleverly designed home Aquaponics system that fits over any 20-gallon aquarium (tall or regular). The

Share Button
Educational Materials / Home Systems

Pittsburgh Aquaponics Open House

Update Feb 24, 2013: Thank you to Jim McCue (below, center) from the Hazelwood Initiative, Justin Thakar (photographer and organizer) of Transition Pittsburgh and the 30 or so other people who came out yesterday for the open house! When: Saturday February 23, 3:30PM Where: 401 Bingham St (South side flats), 2nd floor Why: Come see what an Aquaponics system looks like Ask questions Learn how to build your own Take home (for $5) a do-it-yourself small aquarium aquaponics manual Source: Meetup.com Aquaponics is using fish in fish tanks hooked up to plants in a symbiotic nutrient cycle, to make

Share Button
Home Systems

IBC Tote Bins

The restaurant and food industry have been using IBC (Intermediate Bulk Container) tote bins for years to store perishable foods like olives and cheese. Made out of food-grade plastic, they are also excellent to re-use for a home, school or work-based Aquaponic system. Some restaurant wholesalers will sell their used ones for about $100 each. Two Pittsburghers, Bryan Bischoff and Michael Copeland, friends who met training for the “mudder” race, each have created Aquaponic systems using two IBC tote bins. The totes are 275 gallons in volume but are modified and cut at the top to allow for easy

Share Button
Home Systems

Crushed Black Granite Works as Grow Media

In a flood and drain style Aquaponic system where a grow bed is flooded and then drained to mimic the natural cycles in an estuary, the plants need to root in a sub-strate, also known as media. There are many choices for media including: pea gravel, washed river rock, expanded clay balls (commercially known as Hydroton) and expanded shale. In Western PA, crushed gravel and river rock are problematic because of the limestone content which can wreck your fish tank’s water chemistry by the chemicals that naturally leach from the rocks. The media needs to be pH-neutral Hydroton and

Share Button
Commercial / Home Systems

Recirculating farming

Source: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Doug Oster’s May 26 article “Recycled Aquarium Water Benefits Goldfish and Seedlings” highlights home aquaponics, a soilless method of gardening that pairs hydroponics (growing plants in water) with raising fish (aquaculture). Readers should be aware that aquaponics is more than a rewarding home hobby — it’s also an innovative form of agriculture that produces fresh, healthy foods in an ecologically sound way. Aquaponics is a type of recirculating farming and is what it sounds like — a way to grow food using constantly cleaned and recycled (recirculated) water. Because these farms are closed-loop systems, they can

Share Button
Home Systems

Aquaponics article in the Post-Gazette

Very nice article about Hank Brinzer, a hobbyist in Clinton, who built his own mini Aquaponics system. Source: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette The relaxing sound of trickling water echoes through Hank Brinzer’s attached greenhouse in Clinton. Underneath a bench filled with lush plants, goldfish unknowingly feed seedlings as the water splashes into their tank. It’s hydroponics with a fishy component. “I’ve always been a tinkerer,” the semi-retired 67-year-old gardener says with a laugh. His introduction to gardening came at 14 when his mother handed him a shovel to turn over the family’s large garden. He’s gardened at this home for well

Share Button